January 7, 2019

                I love leftovers, and what better way to use turkey leftovers than to make a "somewhat traditional kedgeree".
Kedgeree is a traditional Scottish (Indian) dish consisting of cooked, flaked Haddock, boiled rice, parsley, hard-boiled eggs, curry powder, and occasionally sultanas and it can be eaten hot or cold. Kedgeree was listed as early as 1790 in the recipe book of Stephana Malcolm of Burnfoot,

Dumfriesshire, Scotland. The National Trust for Scotland's book "The Scottish Kitchen" by Christopher Trotter notes that Malcolm's recipe and other old examples of kedgeree were developed by Scottish regiments stationed in India in the late 1700's and early 1800's, which was then reinvented by the soldiers on their return home back to Scotland. Whatever the history of the dish is, its tastes fantastic and it's so easy to make, plus it's a great way to use up any leftover turkey meat from Christmas day or Thanks Giving.

Christmas leftover Turkey Kedgeree
Serves 4

Ingredients:
4 eggs, free range if possible
2 cups wild rice blend
4 cups low in sodium vegetable or chicken stock
2 tablespoons olive oil
1 large yellow onion, peeled and sliced
2 cloves garlic, peeled and minced
3 cups leftover cooked turkey meat, roughly chopped
2 teaspoons curry powder
2 tablespoons pistachio nuts, chopped
2 tablespoons freshly chopped cilantro

How to make:
Cook the eggs in a pan of boiling water for 6 minutes, then drain and cool under running water. When cold peel off the shell and set aside. (six minutes will give you a nice runny egg yolk, if you like your egg firmer cook for another 2 to 3 minutes).
Cook the rice according to the pack instructions.
Heat the oil in a wok or large frying pan and cook the onion for 5 to 6 minutes or until golden brown in color.
Add the garlic, turkey and curry powder and cook for 3 to 4 minutes.
Stir the rice into the turkey meat, along with the chopped pistachio nuts and cilantro.
Cut the eggs in half and serve with the turkey kedgeree.

 

Enjoy,
Chef Mark .

Copyright © 2018, 2019 Mark Allison